Listen carefully, Vasilisa

As publication date nears, Serenity Press has recorded a short excerpt of Vasilisa the Wise & Other Tales of Brave Young Girls. Have a listen – turn the sound up.

The video was voiced by Monique Mulligan, with music called “Low Horizon” by Kai Engel providing a marvellous soundtrack.

The next step is to create a Spotify playlist! What would you include on it? Add your selections in the comments and we’ll check them out.

 

Don’t forget, you can order your copy of Vasilisa here. It’s shipped worldwide!

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Trailer: Vasilisa the Wise

“Morning is wiser than the evening.” Vasilisa, Russian fairy tale

Our proofs are at the printer and should soon be on the ship, ready for despatch to Australia – we are so thrilled. We’re also thrilled to announce that Kate and Lorena will be working together on a follow-up book, Mollie Whuppie & Other Tales of Brave Young Women, due early 2019.

Here’s a short book trailer highlighting some of the brilliant images you’ll see when Vasilisa the Wise & Tales of Other Brave Women is released – thanks to Lorena for her hard work in making it.

If you  haven’t already pre-ordered your copy, you can do this here.

Seven Podcasts for Fairy Tale Lovers

If you’re anything like me, you use podcasts to get you through the day – out walking, in the car, cooking dinner: all the stuff where sometimes it’s great just to have some else’s voice in your head for a while! I also spend a lot of time at the computer working with images and, strangely enough, listening to other people talking can help the work flow. I do try to keep the subject vaguely related, so over the years I’ve been collecting fairy tale and folklore related podcasts. Here are some of my favourites.

Singing Bones

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Clare Testoni knows her fairy tales. Every episode is meticulously researched, and she brings an enormous amount of knowledge to each one. She tells a version of the tale,  and discusses its variants, where it sits in a historical and cultural context, and its hidden and not so hidden meanings.  Try her episode on Rapunzel, which happens to feature Kate Forsyth talking about her book The Rebirth of Rapunzel: A Mythic Biography of the Maiden on the Tower.

Follow the podcast on Twitter at @singingbonespc and Instagram at @singingbonespodcast.


Deviant Women

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I love Deviant Women. Yes, and this podcast too. *boom tish* To quote them: “Each fortnight, hosts Lauren and Alicia delve into a ‘deviant’ woman from history, fiction, mythology and the contemporary world: those who aren’t afraid to break the rules, to subvert the system, to explore, to seek and to challenge the status quo.

Not strictly a podcast on fairy tales, but they come armed with a lot of fairy tale knowledge (and least one PhD on the subject) and they often focus on a woman from fairy tales. Check out their latest episode on Juleideh, a variant of what you might know better as All Kinds of Fur.

Follow them on Twitter at @DeviantWomen


Feminist Folklore

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I only recently found Feminist Folklore, and I’m so glad I did. Great conversations around folklore from a feminist perspective, with a relaxed presentation and great mix of intelligence and humour. Check out their recent episode on The Juniper Tree.

Follow them on Twitter at @femlorepod and Instagram at @feministfolklorepodcast.


Myths & Legends

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Jason Weiser retells Myths and Legends with varying degrees of modern language. In his episode on the Kelpies, the Scottish Cheiftan’s sons are ‘bros on their party boat’ before they fall foul of the Kelpie horse. The podcast has been around for a couple of years, and it shows in the slick production value and smooth presentation.

Follow Myths and Legends at @MythPodcast.


What The Folklore

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What the Folklore is a funny and slightly irreverent look at folklore and fairy tales, but it’s well balanced by the fact that they know what they’re talking about. There are a couple hundred episodes, and the three presentors have a great rapport. Check out their episode, A Certain Grimminess for their take on the Grimm tale The Seven Ravens.

Find the on Twitter at @WTFolklore


The Folklore Podcast

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The Folklore Podcast is excellent. It definitely has more of a leaning towards folklore over fairy tales, but there is plenty of crossover. Mark Norman is a knowledgeable host, and his guests are interesting and well informed. Check out the episode on Fairy Lore and the Witch Trials.

Follow the podcast on Twitter at @folklorepod.


 

Wallflowers Stories

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Sadly, Amelia and Josh aren’t producing Wallflowers Stories anymore, but it’s well worth going back and listening through their backlist. Fairy tales retold, with a mix of entertaining interjections and intelligent analysis. Try out their episode on Sun, Moon and Talia. I miss them.


 

Okay, so I can’t stop at seven. Here are few more I’ve just discovered and/or haven’t had the chance to listen to much yet, but look interesting.

Malicious Mamas is brand new to me, and I’ve loved the first episode I listened to (Baba Yaga). I can’t wait to delve deeper.

I’m really looking forward to listening to Six Stories, Told at Night, a six part Canadian audio drama about Faeries, writing and the Otherworld. it looks fascinating.

Another fictionalised podcast I’m looking forward to is The Infinite Fairy Tale, a “Dark, surreal and ridiculous comedy inspired by fairy tales and recorded in the moment.”

The Mythology Podcast explores myth, folklore, and legend from throughout history and from all over the world.

When Wishing Still Helped looks at “the surprising and upsetting gruesomeness found in the original versions of well known tales as well as uncovering forgotten oddities.

The Celtic Myth Podshow retells and explores, you guessed it, Celtic Myths in history, culture, landscape and literature. They also play Celtic music, recite poetry and share news. I only just discovered them, but consider me subscribed.

And there are SO MANY podcasts that focus on straight readings of fairy tales. Search them out if you’re in the mood for a bedtime story. I’ll dedicate some listening time to finding some good ones and share them in a future blog post.


 

And now’s your chance to tell me what I missed! What are your favourite fairy tale and folklore podcasts? What gets you through your commute?

Proof of a dream

The creation of a book is often likened to the birth of a baby – it’s a simile that works well, because really, that’s exactly what it is. When authors call their books their “book baby”, they are likening their creation to something they have nurtured from conception to birth, and has a deep connection to their heart.

That moment of conception – the idea – is a gift that, if accepted, is carried through various stages of growth – drafting and redrafting, and shaped into a manuscript of sorts. And then labour begins – the editing and reshaping, culling and rewriting – and the manuscript goes out into the world, searching for its place. During that search, there is more shaping and refining until the book makes its debut.

It’s an emotive process for the writer, the parent, who wants the best for their child, their book.

As a writer myself, I understand this. Birthing a book can be a tumultuous, nerve-wracking, thrilling experience. As a small publisher, the process is no less thrilling, but perhaps the publisher is more the grandparent than the parent.

Last week, Serenity Press had the pleasure of seeing the proofs of Vasilisa the Wise and Other Tales of Brave Young Women. I’ve worked with Kate and Lorena since the beginning, since Kate first asked if someone would be interested in publishing her collection. To see this book, the one I said “Yes” to, knowing deep inside there was a reason for this, brought tears to my eyes.

It’s beautiful. And I am beyond thrilled for Kate and Lorena who deserve their hard work and dreams to come to life like this.

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A few days later Kate and Lorena’s emailed their responses:

  • Lorena: “It’s all my bookish dreams come true.”
  • Kate: ” What a glorious book we have created” and “It is so beautiful it
    makes my heart ache”

So, now we’ve all proofed the copy and it’s been sent back for final changes … and soon … BIRTH!

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Serenity Press, Kate and Lorena cannot wait to share this book with you. And the best thing is … there are more fairy tale books like this to come, with authors like Jane Talbot (The Faerie Thorn) and Sharon Blackie (If Women Rose Rooted) now on our lists.

If you  haven’t already pre-ordered, you can do this here.

Proof copies are on the way!

Behind the scenes, Vasilisa the Wise & Other Tales of Brave Young Women, is shaping up beautifully.

The book design is complete and we’re now nibbling our nails in anticipation of the first proofs. Here’s a sneak peek:

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And here’s another:

In exciting news, a proof will be going to the Frankfurt Book Fair in October – we’ll be sure to keep you updated if anything comes of that.

You can pre-order your copy of Vasilisa the Wise and Other Tales of Brave Young Women here.

The mythology of women working together

A terrific post from Sharon Blackie about women working together.

The tale ‘Kate Crackernuts’, retold in Vasilisa the Wise & Other Tales of Brave Young Women, is a noteworthy example of this in which Katie helps her stepsister Lady Kate.

The Art of Enchantment

One of my favourite stories in Irish mythology is called ‘The Only Jealousy of Emer’ – the Emer in question being the wife of the great warrior (but not so great husband) Cú Chulainn. I love it because it wonderfully subverts the usual ‘betrayed wife’ narrative, and the other cultural narratives which (even to this day) suggest that women can never really trust each other, but can only ever be competitors.

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Twice Upon a Time: books that will make you rethink Fairy Tales

We hope that Vasilisa the Wise and Other Tales of Brave Young Women will encourage people to rethink the fairy tales they have always known. Many people think of princess tales as the standard, but looking back through the history of fairy tales, you’ll find many stories of women who slayed dragons, rescued princes and saved their own lives. If you want to delve deeper into the history and cultural theory of the genre, here are some books that will help you change the way you think about fairy tales.

Fearless Girls, Wise Women and Beloved Sisters: Heroines in Folktales from Around the World. 

This is one of the most loved anthologies in my collection.  It is where I first read The Stolen Child (as The Stolen Bairn) and one I often go back to. As the blurb states, it is: a definitive sourcebook of folktales and fairytales and the first of its kind to feature a variety of multicultural heroines.5e8c1b8d18bc1de6c3e0c383fba7d8cbc6515d9b

 

From the Beast to the Blonde.

If you have an interest in fairy tale theory, then Marina Warner won’t be a new name to you. With a razor sharp wit and delightful writing style, she’s a hero(ine) to many. Here she discusses the history and meaning of fairy tales, and how their different narrators and writers affected the status of the stories they told. For more, try her latest Once Upon a Time.
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Twice Upon a Time

This is a brilliant book on women writers of fairy tales. From the Conteuses of 17th century France to contemporary authors, Wanning Harris discusses how their important contribution the field has often fallen by the wayside. Buy it. Read it. You won’t regret it.


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The Uses of Enchantment

Is now a good time to admit that Jungian psychoanalysis of fairy tales often makes me want to throw things? No? Well, it might not always be my cup of tea, but the focus on self-understanding and accessing inner strengths might just change your preconceptions of the fairy tales you know so well. Bruno Bettleheim’s The Uses of Enchantment is a classic, and one that I’m pleased to admit I’ve never thrown out of a nearby window.  For an alternate view, try Maria Tatar’s excellent Off with their Heads.

Also in my collection is The Feminine in Fairytales, a deep dive into the psychology of many classic tales, and the archetypes and symbolic themes within them. 51uj-Z3cS2L._SL300_

The Victorian Press and the Fairy Tale

The Victorian rise of newspapers heralded somewhat of a golden age for fairy tales. Often released in periodical form it was the first time they were accessible to a mass audience in literary form. This is a fascinating look at how fairy tales were used at the time to debate issues of the day: socialism, women’s rights, racism and more.

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The Irresistible Fairy Tale

I can’t write a list of books without including Jack Zipes. Arguably the god father of fairy tale critical theory, he has written widely on most aspects of the fairy tale. Here is a good place to start.f047a35a6d8affb49338e58080cf8850caa181d0

The Bloody Chamber

Angela Carter is the doyen of contemporary revisionist fairy tales, and her feminist approach is unflinching and fearless. If you have ever dismissed fairy tales as being light hearted fluff for children, The Bloody Chamber is a collection of tales that will change your mind. Seriously, this is not the bedtime collection for your six year old. Or you, if you’re prone to vivid dreams.

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If these have whetted your appetite, here are a few more books that are teetering on my TBR pile. Do you have any favourites that I’ve missed? Leave a comment below, or share this post on social media with a book that changed your perspective on fairy tales.

And don’t forget to pre-order your copy of Vasilisa the Wise and Other Tales of Brave Young Women.

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